Movie showing details of SB 9C spindle removal and replacement; please comment.

I'm very new to these lathes. After getting my 9C I had to remove and check the spindle. I scoured the web and this forum but was frustrated by the lack of details on this process. So in doing it myself I documented it (I make science movies as part of my work). Please take a look and comment on any mistakes I made or things I should clarify, and I'll fix the video.
This would have greatly helped me, so I'm passing on the favor. Leave a comment here with time code on the movie for the fix.
https://vimeo.com/77662098
Two things to start: I should have fastened the lathe down to the bench and second, should have oiled everything up more thoroughly before reinstalling the spindle.
Thanks! I'm busy as hell at work now and may be slow to reply here and/or fix the movie.
Steve

I've seen a better SBL 9" spindle removal on YouTube. I think a puller made from PVC and threaded rod is a better way to go. Also, you should take some measurements before the removal to help with the reinstall so you know if you've got everything seated properly. You need to know the proper measurements for alignment, clearance, and spacing. You should also emphasize proper alignment of the spindle key with the gear. You don't want to be pounding on the lathe with these two misaligned. Did you loosen the spindle clamping bolts before you pounded out the spindle? There should be a spindle bearing clearance adjustment check with a spindle removal and reinstall. The spindle bolts should be tightened with a torque wrench. Also, you should cover proper cleaning and inspection of the bearings. Removal of the spindle is a good time to upgrade the take-up washer with a steel thrust needle-roller bearing. They don't cost much if you get it from McMaster-Carr and the upgrade offers an improvement in performance.
I don't think this video depicts the best professional technique for spindle removal. It needs to be redone to be an excellent example to follow. You don't want to post a bad example of how not to do it.
Regards

Nice work.
One thing I've never seen addressed is end play on the cone pulley.
My feeling is that there should be some, not much but some.
One way would be to put wedges between the bull gear and cone pulley when pressing the spindle in.
The wedges would of course be removed before adjusting the end play.
That of course has nothing to do with your excellent video, it's only my brain fart.
Ken from Canada.

tgolden, I really appreciate your assessment; clearly I missed a lot. Through my Internet research, including a lot here, there is much disagreement on whether to loosen the clamping bolts. Also I carefully (it's not obvious but I can make it so in the video) felt to make sure the key went in properly, that's where I was pushing things together by hand.
You are the first I've seen mention pre-measurement. In my case the bearings, as you can see, are pristine, so cleaning wasn't an issue.
Edit: I've rebuilt engines and so was super careful with hygiene around the bearings and will mention this in the final.
I can make a note on the video regarding spindle clearance check. I did this, but didn't mention it.
I will leave the video up but put all of your critiques in the final so people can make their own judgements. If somebody does a better one I will gladly take it down.
Sound reasonable, folks? I'm happy to put all the caveats in. Again, this would have really helped me, and I could not find anything else on the web like it.
Edit: If people have criticisms they can support with links to threads, whatever, I am more than happy to put those in the video as well. Also I have a blog where I can put all this stuff to help future owners.
Steve

I think the clamping bolts should be loosened. You should only be forcing the spindle to unseat the key from the gear. I don't think it's in the interest of the spindle or the spindle bearings to be sliding them laterally to their normal rotation under the force of the clamping bolts. Checking for spindle play should be part of the pre and post spindle removal and replacement operation. Addressing the proper cleaning and inspection of the bearings, spindle, oil galleries, etc..., would be helpful as well as proper pre-lubrication of the parts before reassembly.
Regards

I scoured the web and this forum but was frustrated by the lack of details on this process.

This is pretty "hot off the press", but it's worth sharing. Greg did a great job documenting the removal the spindle from his 9"
Spindle Removal - YouTube

This is pretty "hot off the press", but it's worth sharing. Greg did a great job documenting the removal the spindle from his 9"
Spindle Removal - YouTube

This video by Greg is excellent way to remove the spindle with little mallet work. Only two very minor comments. One, I would protect the ways with a board. And two (real nit picking) use the adjustable wrench in the correct direction, he is pulling against the jaw of the wrench.... I know seems silly but drives me nuts. I taught shop for 30 years and saw kids wipe out the jaws on Crescent wrenches.
I hope he does another video on how to install the spindle properly.
Ed S

I'm thinking Greg is a carpenter.
Wood blocks instead of steel washers made with his lathe?
Muffler tubing instead of a steel tube made with his lathe?
Using the tool of second to last resort and only one step above a pipe wrench?
However it did work as well as a BFH and a wood block, not better but as well.
Ken from Canada.

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